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Research & Facilities

 

Building Envelope Performance Lab CFI

 

 

Research Facilities

Environmental Chamber and Solar Simulator

Environmental Chamber

Solar Simulator – Environmental Chamber Lab

 

The most recent realization is the Environmental Chamber designed to test new concepts in the performance of the building envelope. The Environmental Chamber provides the setting for building envelope studies on topics such as the following:
  • Thermal transmittance resistance of walls, windows
  • Condensation resistance
  • Air leakage
  • Freeze-thaw effects and crack formation
  • Heat storage

The Environmental Chamber consists of two chambers representing indoor and outdoor conditions, denoted as hot and cold boxes. Between the boxes a hollow rectangular frame may be sandwiched, in which building envelope large scale components can be fixed or built up. Lab space is 273 sq. m.

The Environmental Chamber provides a facility for building science studies in many areas such as thermal cycling, heat storage, insulation, thermal warping, freeze-thaw, air infiltration, condensation, air quality, construction productivity and automation, and control strategies. The thermal performance tests evaluate the steady-state and dynamic characteristics of heat transfer through composite wall assemblies of 23'6" height x 13'6" width x 2'6" thick. The facility is designed to test composite specimens with floor structures and fenestration.

 

Research staff

 

Research activities

Range of Tests

  • Steady-state thermal resistance of wall assemblies (ASTM C236)(ASTM C976)
  • Dynamic thermal tests exposing wall assemblies to transient and periodic simulated weather conditions
  • Configured as a climatic chamber, the facility may host testing rooms
  • Construction productivity experiments to study the effect of various climatic conditions on thermal comfort and productivity of people in simulated indoor or outdoor conditions
  • Large scale air leakage tests
  • Rain
  • Air movement measurement

 

 


 
 

Concordia University